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August 28, 2017 | Last Modified: 2017

Travel Experience

Founded in 2000, Ock Pop Tok was created by two friends – a local weaver and a visiting English photographer. Their vision was to blend their passion for textiles with their desire to be a positive force for change. Ock Pop Tok means East Meets West and is a perfect expression of what visiting one of their shops, or the Living Crafts Center, is like.

Responsibility

Ock Pop Tok was founded on principles of fair trade and sustainable business practices, and was pioneering social business and ethical fashion before these terms were even a part of our cultural lexicon.

Business Case

Veo and Jo realised early on that in order for hand loomed textiles to survive and thrive as a craft, they had to create economic value for the textiles. Weaving, which is done primarily by village women, is often considered domestic work that is not representative of progress or economic advancement. By operating on fair trade principles – specifically by providing competitive wages, opportunities for continued learning and professional development – OPT gave village weavers, most of whom are women, the ability to earn a sustainable livelihood for their families and communities. And, by opening a venue where visitors could see and practice the craft, the two were able to educate visitors about the cultural and the artistic value of the textiles.

Google Map

Founded in 2000, Ock Pop Tok was created by two friends – a local weaver and a visiting English photographer. Their vision was to blend their passion for textiles with their desire to be a positive force for change. Ock Pop Tok means East Meets West and is a perfect expression of what visiting one of their shops, or the Living Crafts Center, is like.

Ock Pop Tok was founded on principles of fair trade and sustainable business practices, and was pioneering social business and ethical fashion before these terms were even a part of our cultural lexicon.

Veo and Jo realised early on that in order for hand loomed textiles to survive and thrive as a craft, they had to create economic value for the textiles. Weaving, which is done primarily by village women, is often considered domestic work that is not representative of progress or economic advancement. By operating on fair trade principles – specifically by providing competitive wages, opportunities for continued learning and professional development – OPT gave village weavers, most of whom are women, the ability to earn a sustainable livelihood for their families and communities. And, by opening a venue where visitors could see and practice the craft, the two were able to educate visitors about the cultural and the artistic value of the textiles.

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